The Slocum House is a Victorian style house located in Vancouver, Washington, in the United States. The style also has been called Carpenter Victorian to emphasize both the vertical, Italianate features and the skill of craftsmanship, believed to be the work of Edward Slocum, brother of the owner. Ornamental medallions inside the house were signed and included patent dates from 1842 and 1846, although the house is believed by some to have been constructed in 1867. The 1867 date is not supported by local newspaper reports as there was no dwelling on the land at this time, and Charles W. Slocum was still busy in other areas of the Pacific Northwest. However many websites and reference books do mention the 1867 date, perhaps using a common source.

After returning to Vancouver, Washington Territory in 1869, Slocum became interested in building a mansion in the vicinity of downtown Vancouver. The foundation was laid in May 1877, further progress despite “its large dimensions, and the substantial character of the materials and work” was reported in late June 1877, and work was completed by the beginning of 1878. When completed and unveiled to society on New Year’s Day in 1878, the local paper described it as follows:

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Slocum received their friends at their elegant new home on New Year’s day. They have now finished and nearly furnished one of the handsomest residences in Washington Territory. For completeness, neatness, convenience, and architectural beauty, it discounts any house we know of in the country. Their friends are glad to see them so agreeably situated.

Charles W. Slocum had been trained as a carpenter in Rhode Island, and in 1857 he arrived in Vancouver and worked as a carpenter at the Vancouver Barracks. Later, he became superintendent of the barracks. In 1860, Slocum opened several general stores in the Pacific Northwest. He is credited with platting the town of Boise, Idaho, in 1863.

The Slocum House is the only surviving structure in its former residential neighborhood of the Vancouver historic core. It was moved one block from its original location in 1966 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.